Resolutions

This afternoon a friend asked me what resolutions I planned to make tonight for New Year’s Eve. I hadn’t even thought about that at all. I used to do quite elaborate things with lists and cards and runes and sewajus and write everything in notebooks — and probably never looked at them again. And this time, for the first time I could remember, I seemed not to be doing anything at all. How odd.

Without thinking, I said, “I’ve decided not to do any resolutions at all.”

“So, you’ve resolved not to make any resolutions, have you?”

“Right!”

“I remember you decided not to make any last year — and the year before.”

“Yes, but later I changed my mind and made them anyway. Then I forgot about them and when I remembered, I scolded myself for forgetting. So this time I really won’t do it at all.”

Later on in the evening, my phone rang. It was a pre-arranged call from my friend, Nancy, so we could do New Year’s Eve readings for each other as we usually do on the turning points of the year. I promptly forgot the whole resolution thing as we looked at where we each were now, what we wanted to leave behind us, and what we wanted to bring into our lives. (There may have been some sort of hints at resolutions there, but if there were, the word was never mentioned.)

At the end of the process, I drew a final card: What did O Universe want to tell us? Ilbe the Retriever turned up to say that he was keeping our old lost dreams and desires safe, and the time was coming very soon (like now!) when we would do well to bring them back into our lives to enjoy.

We talked about what those lost, forgotten dreams might be — Nancy’s had to do with music, mine with faery arts.

While we were discussing that, I remembered that another friend, John Logan, used to say that anything you learned after the age of 56 would become an inborn talent in your next life. We laughed about this, since the forgotten dreams were things we’d already planned to do well in our next lives.

Not resolutions — not at all. It’s the difference between “You must … !” and “Wouldn’t it be lovely to … ?”